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early textile needle case embroidered in queen's stitch dated 1801
early textile needle case embroidered in queen's stitch dated 1801
early textile needle case embroidered in queen's stitch dated 1801

Early textile needle case elaborately embroidered in Queen’s stitch. The Queen’s stitch, also called the Rococo, first appeared on 17th-century English band and spot samplers and continued to be a very popular into the 18th century. It was a favorite canvas work stitch of America's colonial needleworkers, often covering the entire surface of needle cases, pincushions and pinballs, and envelope-type pocketbooks and purses. The Queen’s stitch also appeared on early American samplers.


The background of this early textile is tightly stitched in greens and teals, punctuated with colorful motifs done in petite Queen’s stitch patterns.  Across the top is a blue band upon which is embroidered Mary Hillman 1801.  The base fabric appears to be natural linen.  According to the “granny note” attached to the back of the frame, this piece was wrought by Mary Hillman in 1801, and given to her sister Martha Brown; then descended through the Brown family. 

 

The condition is excellent, the colors are saturated and vibrant, the embroidery is skillfully wrought. 

Dimensions:  needlework 4 5/8 x 9 3/8; frame 7.5” x 11.25”.

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